The Big Bang: Energy, meet Matter

How did we get here?

Maria, played by Julie Andrews in the movie The Sound of Music, provided this advice: “Let’s start from the very beginning. That’s a very good place to start.” OK. In the very beginning, there was nothing.

Nil. Zip. Nothing.

Time? Nil. Space? None. Matter? Zero. Energy? Forget it.

The situation changed dramatically 13,700,000,000 years ago. Time and space and energy and matter began. Thirteen point seven billion years ago. That’s even longer than a 15-inning baseball game.

The Big Bang happened – a big, big, BIG bang.  From nil, zip, nothing to all of the mass and energy now still in the Universe. Matter and energy hurled in every direction. The time clock started ticking.   Einstein put mass on one side and energy on the other of his famous equation E = mc2. In that equation, “c” means “speed light travels.” The speedometers in all that flying stuff read “c.”

All the mass and energy that exist in the Universe today came from that one Big Bang. No new energy has been created. No energy has been lost.

Energy flying in every direction. Think of a fireworks display. A rocket flies up high then explodes. Pretty white bright lines shoot in a straight in every direction. Crowd cheers. Picture those Big Bang speed-of-light lines shooting in every direction.

matterNewton’s first law says a body in motion stays in motion unless some external force gets in the way. According to that rule, the matter should have just kept going – forever – since no friction existed. That would have led to a flat and featureless Universe.   No stars, no planets, no rivers and mountains, no me, no you, and not a single McDonald’s yellow arch.

So, is that the end of the story?

Dumb question because we ARE alive. That fast-moving stuff flying in every direction contained a surprising hidden something-or-other. That was the external force. The external force caused matter to be attracted to other matter. By that something-or-other force.

Stuff happened. Most of us older people think that electron, proton, and neutron are the smallest particles. Wrong. After Big Bang, that stuff flying through space had fancy new names. Whatever the names, they were banging into each other. After a while, they stuck together and BECAME electrons, protons and neutrons. Then atoms, made from electrons, neutrons and protons, began appearing. First was hydrogen, the simplest atom.

Back to that unexplained force.

Next post: Gravitational attraction at work

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